Vegetarian Recipe: Ginger Carrot Soup

Ginger Carrot SoupCarrot soup is made more delectable with dry white wine, curry powder, and ginger in this recipe adapted from The Silver Palate Good Times Cookbook by Julee Rosso & Sheila Alukins. In this vegetable soup recipe, onions, ginger, and garlic are sautéed in butter. Chicken stock, dry white wine, and carrots are added and simmered until the carrots are tender and flavored with fresh lemon juice, curry powder, salt, and ground pepper. The soup is pureed until smooth and can be served either hot or cold. This is especially delicious with crusty bread or a side of salad. This delicious soup is also quite therapeutic and can help alleviate cold or flu.

Ginger carrot soup can be served as refreshing easy appetizers or a light meal with salad and bread. If you want a vegetarian version, you can use vegetable stock instead of chicken stock. The curry powder and ginger adds a subtle spice to the dish and a tingling sensation in the palate. The wonderful aroma of the soup also adds to the eating experience and the beautiful color of the dish enlivens any dinner table.

Use an immersion blender, regular blender, or food processor for pureeing the soup. If you are using a regular blender, puree the soup in batches and reheat them before serving (or chill in the fridge and serve cold). There are many ways you can garnish this dish. For a healthy option, garnish the dish with yogurt and herbs like parsley, celery, basil, thyme, or coriander.

Ingredients: 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, 1 large yellow onion, diced, ¼ cup freshly grated ginger root, 3 garlic cloves, minced, 7 cups chicken stock, 1 cup dry white wine, 1 ½ lbs. carrots, peeled and sliced into ½ in. pieces, 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice, Curry powder, Sea salt, Freshly ground pepper

Preparation Instructions: Ginger Carrot Soup Recipe

In a stock pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the onion, ginger, and garlic, sautéing for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the onion is translucent. Add the stock, wine, and carrots. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 45 minutes, or until carrots are tender. Using an immersion blender, traditional blender, or food processor, puree the soup, working in batches. Add the juice, a pinch of curry powder, and salt and pepper.

For a more savory soup, you can garnish with bacon bits, caramelized onions, fried garlic, sautéed mushrooms, croutons, sour cream, diced hard-boiled egg. You can also garnish the soup with diced and blanched carrots, sautéed asparagus, diced zucchini, cucumber, broccoli, or grilled eggplant. Ginger carrot soup is also delicious with Indian flatbreads like roti or chapatti.

Source: www.gourmandia.com

Low sodium

“Pass the salt” is a common thing being heard in the food table. We all need our salt one way or the other.

Aside from providing flavor in best cooking videos, table salt is the most common source of sodium.  Sodium is a nutrient that is needed by the body to regulate blood pressure, blood volume, and osmotic equilibrium.  Aside from the white substance found in your condiment stand, sodium can be found in beef jerky, pickles, and processed meat, as salt is a main ingredient in food preservation.

Too much sodium could be a bad thing in chef videos cooking.  An example of this could be the bloating from eating too much junk food or chips.  Bloating is just a tip of the iceberg.  Long-term diseases as a result of too much sodium could be hypertension, heart disease, high blood pressure, and kidney complications.  Today’s fast-paced life resulting in a diet consisting mostly of preserved foods could be the cause of this.

 

Those suffering from hypertension and high blood pressure are advised to have a low-sodium diet, which limits sodium intake to 1500-2400 mgs of sodium per day (approximately less than a teaspoon).  This isn’t as boring as totally removing salt from food and eating bland and tasteless food.  Just like creating art, it’s time to bring out creativity in tickling the taste buds.  How about using apples and cinnamon, commonly found in popular dessert to flavor prawns in olive oil? Substitute candied citrus peels for a TV snack instead of a bowl of chips.  If butter and toast is a staple in your breakfast meals, then try unsalted butter instead (available also at the grocery section).

 

In these recipes, most of the meats used are fresh meats found in the meat section of the market or grocery instead of them being in canned or smoked forms, eliminating the need of excess salt.  Flavorings such as sugar, herbs, honey, and pepper can be used.  For a fresher, sharper peppery taste, crack the peppercorn with a mortar and pestle.  A bit of tang?  Use some lime or lemon juice or freshly-pressed garlic.

 

A low-sodium diet can be fun.  It’s all a matter of exploring the spice rack or travelling to the meat section.   There are interesting flavors to be tasted and new dishes created.  Having fun creating these delicious meals can save you money from eating out, and your heart health will thank you for it.